Sandra's advice to women considering this field is to take a year of general sciences first. Visit some hospitals and get a sense of how you would feel about working in that environment.


If you want to follow Sandra's career path, you must have high marks in biology, chemistry, math, and physics.nc


Sandra got into this field with the advice of a close family friend. She gave him a course list from a technical school. He went through it and selected Biomedical Engineering as a field with good pay and a great future. Good call.

Sandra’s advice to women considering this field is to take a year of general sciences first. Visit some hospitals and get a sense of how you would feel about working in that environment.


Did you know? Advanced technology will result in the creation of more technical health care aids, which, in turn, will require greater numbers of skilled technologists for maintenance and repair.


Being a biomedical technician is a really interesting combination of science and high tech hardware. And there are a lot of opportunities to build on in this career.


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SYNOPSIS:

If you've ever gone to the hospital, you probably didn't give the equipment there a second thought. And you don't have to. That's Sandra Swanson's job. Biomedical Technologist Sandra Swanson spent almost four years at university before diagnosing her aspirations and coming up with a different prescription: a two year technical program in biomedical engineering.

Today, Sandra is paid nearly $50,000 a year to maintain, repair and evaluate medical equipment. The prognosis? A great future as a biomedical technologist!


PERSONAL DATA:

Education: British Columbia Institute of Technology

Hobbies: Sailing, road trips, scuba diving, working out, playing piano, needlework, knitting, sewing, playing Nintendo